Quick tips for organizing and Storing digital photos

 

Learn how to name photos, create organized folders, and organize your photo library so you can stay organized 

 

 

Introduction

 

Having a system for organizing your photos can make searching through your photo library a whole lot easier. Start with these basic practices, and then customize your own approach.  

 

Edit your library      

 

Simplify your photo-sorting process by eliminating pictures you don't need. As soon as you download images, delete the shots that are unusable-whether they're overexposed, underexposed, duplicates, or pictures where your thumb got in the way. But be sure to keep the ones that a little image editing can improve.

 

Name your photos     

 

Using the following techniques, you can easily name all your photos. Giving your photos clearly identifiable filenames will help you find the images you're looking for quickly and easily.

 

 

Name as you download

 

Name your photos as a part of your download routine. Chances are, if you wait, they won't get named. After you download your photos from your camera, rename your files individually (if you only have a few) by simply clicking the file name once to highlight and edit.

 

 

 

 

 

Add descriptions

 

Digital cameras assign pictures alphanumeric names. But who remembers that JX1000054 was that wonderful sunset shot from your honeymoon? Giving pictures descriptive names as soon as you download them will help you remember what they are and who's in them. Name files consistently and add descriptive details within the title for easy retrieval later on. For example: "Pismo_as_a_puppy.jpg" and "Pismo_at_beach.jpg" rather than "dog_at_beach.jpg" or "dog12.jpg."

 

 

Rename existing photos by batching

 

It's easy to automatically rename many files at once (called "batching") with the Windows XP operating system.

 

Open a folder of images you want to rename. Highlight all the images in the folder by selecting Edit and Select All from the menu bar.

 

Right click the first photo in the folder and select Rename.

 

Enter a name that can describe every image in the folder. For example: Becky's_birthday_2006.jpg. Be sure to add the file type (.jpg is the most widely used for images).

 

Windows XP will then automatically rename all the files in the folder and number them in order.

 

Use HP photo-editing software

The Photosmart software that comes with many HP cameras and photo printers also allows you to rename and re-date specific image folders and photos.

 

Create descriptive folders      

 

Because adding dates to each individual picture can make for unwieldy file names, you may want to use the month and year to label each folder and subfolder. Once again, consistency is key.

 

Use either the name or the number of the month throughout, and either two or four digits for the year.

 

Create a master folder for each year, and subfolders for categories and individual events within that year. For example, within the folder "2006," create a subfolder for "Events," with folders for "Birthday parties" and "Sarah" inside.

 

 

Add keywords

 

 

Both HP Photosmart Premier and HP Photosmart Essential allow you to software add keywords to your photos. Simply click on the thumbnail in the View area to see the details of the selected file and add a memorable keyword (like the names of people in the photo). Later, you can search by those keywords to quickly track down the photos you want. 

 

Introduction

Holidays, birthdays, vacations, and more-archiving photos of these memories assures they will be well-protected against corruption, data loss, or accidental deletion. It will also free up much needed hard drive space. Explore the different archiving options and get some handy quick tips that will help you preserve your pictures for years to come.

Stay organized


Create a schedule for archiving your photos-maybe once a month or every 100 photos. Once you've decided on a schedule that works for you, decide which storage method (or combination of methods) you'd like to use.

Check out Quick tips for organizing photos for more helpful hints on saving your files and setting up folders.

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Burn photos to CD or DVD


Burning discs takes longer than simply transferring data to a hard drive, but it's wise to have extra copies of your files for safekeeping. If properly cared for, CDs and DVDs can last from 30 to 100 years. If improperly stored, however, they can be scratched and, therefore, corrupted.

It is also important to use a high-quality CD or DVD media from manufacturers you recognize, such as HP. Lower-quality media may deteriorate over time, making it difficult if not impossible to read.

Keep the following in mind when choosing a CD or DVD for archiving:

·               Choose media that's compatible with your disc burner (check your product's technical specifications).

·               Select a disc that meets your needs. A CD holds about 700MB, and a DVD can hold 4.7GB (or 15,000 high-quality pictures!).

·               Label your media. If you have a LightScribe drive, burn your photos to a LightScribe enabled CD or DVD, then flip it and burn a custom laser-etched label on top.

·               HP CD/DVD Tattoos add brilliant color photos and graphics, and are highly durable—they resist water and fading better than traditional paper labels.

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Archive photos on external hard drives


External drives are compact, portable devices that connect to your computer. They can be taken anywhere and connected to other computers for quick access to your images. And depending on the drive capacity, they can store many more photos than a CD or DVD.

·               Flash drives offer up to 4GB of storage and plug directly into a USB port on your PC. Because they're thin and narrow, they generally don't compete for space with other devices (such as a printer).

·               HP personal media drives are ideal for large files, if not your entire digital photo collection (up to 400GB of storage!). They connect to your computer with a USB cable, or can be inserted into the personal media drive bay included on some HP desktop PCs.

To archive photos to an external hard drive, just connect the drive to your PC and drag and drop files to it (the duration of this process may vary slightly from drive to drive). Usually, it takes only seconds.

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Store photos online


Online photo albums are the best way to store and share your pictures on the Web. With Snapfish (a service of HP) you can share individual pictures or entire albums with friends and family, and even allow them to order prints of their favorite photos.

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Additional quick tips

·               Make two disc copies. Keep one close at hand and one locked away somewhere safe (like a safe deposit box) in case of breakage, data corruption, theft, or fire.

·               Print proof, or contact sheets, of images stored on each DVD or CD and keep them with the discs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Quick Tips for Organizing Photos

 

Introduction

 

 Holidays, birthdays, vacations, and more-archiving photos of these memories assures they will be well-protected against corruption, data loss, or accidental deletion. It will also free up much needed hard drive space. Explore the different archiving options and get some handy quick tips that will help you preserve your pictures for years to come.  

 

Stay organized

 

Create a schedule for archiving your photos-maybe once a month or every 100 photos. Once you've decided on a schedule that works for you, decide which storage method (or combination of methods) you'd like to use.

 

Check out Quick tips for organizing photos for more helpful hints on saving your files and setting up folders.

 

Burn photos to CD or DVD

 

Burning discs takes longer than simply transferring data to a hard drive, but it's wise to have extra copies of your files for safekeeping. If properly cared for, CDs and DVDs can last from 30 to 100 years. If improperly stored, however, they can be scratched and, therefore, corrupted.

 

It is also important to use a high-quality CD or DVD media from manufacturers you recognize, such as HP. Lower-quality media may deteriorate over time, making it difficult if not impossible to read.

 

Keep the following in mind when choosing a CD or DVD for archiving:

 

Choose media that's compatible with your disc burner (check your product's technical specifications).

 

Select a disc that meets your needs. A CD holds about 700MB, and a DVD can hold 4.7GB (or 15,000 high-quality pictures!).

 

Label your media. If you have a LightScribe drive, burn your photos to a LightScribe enabled CD or DVD, then flip it and burn a custom laser-etched label on top.

 

HP CD/DVD Tattoos add brilliant color photos and graphics, and are highly durable—they resist water and fading better than traditional paper labels.

 

Flexible DVD media

 

You can record photos to DVD+R ("recordable") discs, which record data only once, or record them to DVD+RW ("rewritable") discs, which you can write or record over about 1,000 times. DVD+R discs are cheaper, but you may want to spend a little more on DVD+RW discs for the added flexibility.

 

DVD writers are not only fast, but also versatile. You can literally burn thousands of photos to a DVD in minutes, and tens of thousands to a double-layer DVD. And with LightScribe technology you can burn silkscreen-quality labels and artwork directly onto LightScribe-enabled CDs and DVDs—right inside the drive!

 

DVD+R with photos on them can be played on most DVD players, including computer DVD drives and TV DVD video players.

 

Archive photos on external hard drives

 

External drives are compact, portable devices that connect to your computer. They can be taken anywhere and connected to other computers for quick access to your images. And depending on the drive capacity, they can store many more photos than a CD or DVD.

 

Flash drives offer up to 4GB of storage and plug directly into a USB port on your PC. Because they're thin and narrow, they generally don't compete for space with other devices (such as a printer).

 

 

HP personal media drives are ideal for large files, if not your entire digital photo collection (up to 400GB of storage!). They connect to your computer with a USB cable, or can be inserted into the personal media drive bay included on some HP desktop PCs.

 

To archive photos to an external hard drive, just connect the drive to your PC and drag and drop files to it (the duration of this process may vary slightly from drive to drive). Usually, it takes only seconds.

 

Store photos online

 

Online photo albums are the best way to store and share your pictures on the Web. With Snapfish (a service of HP) you can share individual pictures or entire albums with friends and family, and even allow them to order prints of their favorite photos.

 

 

 

 

Additional quick tips

 

Make two disc copies. Keep one close at hand and one locked away somewhere safe (like a safe deposit box) in case of breakage, data corruption, theft, or fire.

 

Print proof, or contact sheets, of images stored on each DVD or CD and keep them with the discs.

 

Software options

 

Discover how software like HP Photosmart Premier can let you remove red-eye, adjust color and lighting, and fix brightness and contrast in your digital photos. It's included with many HP imaging products—or you can download HP Photosmart Essential for free.

 

Consider using ArcSoft Showbiz editing software (included with most HP PCs and DVD writers) to produce your photo scrapbook as a movie. Or you can use HP Photosmart Premier and Windows XP Media Center Edition to create a slideshow with music.

 

Once you've got your photos and movie masterpieces archived on a DVD, give the disc a professional-quality label. Most HP PCs feature LightScribe technology, which lets you burn personalized, laser-etched labels directly onto the disc.

 

DVD technology has many advantages over other portable, shareable digital storage options. A DVD holds 4.7GB of data, which translates to more than 15,000 high-quality pictures. That's about seven times the capacity of a CD. And HP's innovative double-layer recording technology lets you use double-layer DVDs to record almost twice as much data as you can on single-layer DVDs. Compare CDs and DVDs to see what's right for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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